Clement Avenue/Tilden Way

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Announcement: City staff/consultant team will be requesting Transportation Commission approval of the Clement Avenue/Tilden Way Improvement Project concept on Wed., Jan. 25, 2023 at 6:30 p.m. and then will be requesting City Council approval on Tues., March 7, 2023.

Background: The Clement Avenue/Tilden Way project uses the abandoned railroad right-of-way at Clement Avenue and Tilden Way to extend the Cross Alameda Trail between Broadway and the Miller-Sweeney/Fruitvale Bridge and to improve the truck and bus routes in this area.  This project connects to the City's Clement Avenue Complete Street project, and to the City of Oakland's planned and funded Fruitvale Avenue improvements.  In 2017, the Alameda County Transportation Commission awarded a grant to the City of Alameda for $8.4 million to implement this project. This project is funded by Measure BB, Alameda County's transportation sales tax.

Concept: Includes a bikeway, walkway, road diet, westbound Clement Avenue extension, open space, stormwater gardens, bus stop improvements, a dog park and a roundabout at the Blanding/Tilden/Fernside intersection.  Road diets reduce crashes up to 47 percent.  Roundabouts reduce fatal and severe injury crashes up to 78 percent compared to traffic signals.  

Email List/Project Correspondence: To receive project updates via email, subscribe directly here.  Please direct questions or comments to Gail Payne by phone at (510) 747-6892 or by email at gpayne@alamedaca.gov.

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2016

  • October: Alameda CTC CIP grant submittal

2017

  • April: Won an Alameda CTC Measure BB grant totaling $8.4 million with $1 million local match to fund the right-of-way purchase, planning, environmental clean-up, design and construction
  • June: City Council appropriated $1.7 million in Measure BB grant funds and $548,000 of local match for fiscal years 2017 to 2019 as shown in the Capital Improvement Program Project Sheet(PDF, 313KB)

2018

  • July: City Council authorized the pre-construction grant funding agreement with Alameda CTC totaling $2 million in Measure BB funds and $445,000 in local match - Staff report: click here
  • Sept: City Council approved taking action to acquire Union Pacific property via eminent domain for the Clement Avenue/Tilden Way extension - Staff report: click here

2019

  • June: City Council appropriated an additional $2 million in Measure BB grant funds and $470,000 of local match for fiscal years 2019 to 2021 as shown in the CIP Project Sheet(PDF, 176KB)

2021

  • August: City purchased Clement/Tilden property from Union Pacific via eminent domain for $1.54 million

2022

  • Feb 17: Project Kick-off
  • May: Online survey
  • May 18: Virtual community workshop via Zoom
  • May 19: In-person Open House - Main Library
  • October: Online survey
  • Oct 11: Virtual community workshop via Zoom
  • Oct 13: In-person Open House - Main Library

2023

  • Jan 25: AC Transit Interagency Liaison Committee
  • Wed, Jan 25: Transportation Commission (request approval of recommended concept) - Staff report: click here
  • Tues, March 7: City Council (request approval of recommended concept)
  • Design

2024

  • Construction

 

 

2022

2023

  • Jan 25: AC Transit Interagency Liaison Committee - presentation(PDF, 4MB)
  • Wed, Jan 25: Transportation Commission - request approval of the recommended concept - staff report
  • Tues, March 7: City Council - request approval of the recommended concept
  • Design

2024

  • Construction

 

 

Project Goals

For the Clement Avenue/Tilden Way Project, the City seeks to:

  • Promote safety by prioritizing Vision Zero
  • Improve mobility for all modes, including AC Transit buses and trucks
  • Comply with City plans & policies
  • Provide flood reduction and landscaping opportunities
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Countermeasures

The City staff/consultant team will consider various countermeasures to improve safety and operations such as road diets and roundabouts as described more below.

Road Diets

The reduction of motor vehicle travel lane(s) provides an opportunity to reallocate space for other uses such as bike lanes and a center two-way left-turn lane.  According to the Federal Highway Administration's informational guide(PDF, 2MB) , streets with travel lane reductions have multiple benefits for people driving, walking and bicycling, such as:
  • Decreases vehicle travel lanes for pedestrians to cross;
  • Allows for better visibility of pedestrians waiting or attempting to cross the street;
  • Improves circulation for bicyclists when a bikeway is added;
  • Reduces rear-end, sideswipe and left-turn collisions by at least 19 percent and up to 47 percent through the use of a center two-way left-turn lane;
  • Improves speed limit compliance by three to five miles per hour, which reduces the severity of collisions; and
  • Improves travel flow since through vehicles are separated from left turning vehicles.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has a case studies document and additional resources.  FHWA Video and Fact Sheets are as follows:

Roundabouts

Roundabouts reduce the types of crashes where people are seriously hurt or killed by up to 78 percent when compared to signalized intersections.  Roundabouts result in lower vehicle speeds around the roundabout.  Crashes that occur will be less severe because of this reduced speed and the more “sideswipe” nature of crashes.  Pedestrians are generally safer at roundabouts, and are faced with simpler decisions at a time. Videos and presentations on roundabouts are as follows: